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in which science and scientists played a central and vital role. the manhattan project, the thousands of physicists and other scientists who developed the atomic bomb was the most dramatic illustration of this, i think probably today almost as well known were the thousands of mathematicians and other sign b terrific work withers in england and washington, d.c. who broke the german e anything ma, cipher and other access codes. the very small group of parish parish -- british and american scientists who really turned the tide in the battle against the u-boats are not so nearly well known at all. but their contribution was, i think, every bit as vital not only in winning one of the most crucial battles in the war against nazi germany, but also for its lasting consequences in revolutionizing the very way military commanders think about war. for that matter, revolution eyeing the way quantitative an access could be apply today a host of practical problems in the business world through the new science patrick plaqueet and his -- blacket and his scientists created during the war, operational
in forecast, what physics meteorologist and the natural sciences can teach us about economics, physicist explain the ebb and flow of market of economy can relate to science. look for the title in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near too future on booktv and booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here's a look at the prime time lineup for tonight. .. now author sara carr explores the results of the state legislature's decision shortly after hurricane katrina to re-assign control over the majority of new orleans public schools to the recovery school district, administered by the state. by following a student, teacher, and a principal as they traverse different segments of the education until system. this is a half an hour. >> it's great to see so many people out tonight who do such amazing work for kids in new orleans, and thank you for coming. i'm just going to talk for about 10 or 15 minutes or so and then take questions, and there's some people here tonight who are in the book and they might be willing to answer your questions during th
in computer science. he said, come look at my computer lab, i went to his computer lab and he had the big machine and it looked impressive to me. i had a mac at home. he said let me show you something, it's the first time i saw the worldwide web. it showed exhibit and had picture and text. as far as i knew the internet was text. i said, james, if you can have text on the computer why can't we have a newspaper on the web? i said that and he said, well, maybe we should something like that? one thing lead to another and the times started a task force of online. they put out the first website in january '96, i became the first editor of the website. so i changed completely from the traditional journalist to a website journalist, it was quite an education for me. >> do you want know keep going and going? tell me. let me tell you a little bit about the conclusion. i shouldn't tell you too much. i want do you buy the book. [laughter] this is what happened. to have a book like this, you expect that you're going have a know where it comes out. the reporters at the time told me we were going come o
tv physician and science writer talking about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. he argues that pharmaceutical companies hide negative studies and use expensive lobbying to get what they want. the event from seattle's town hall lasts about ninety minutes. [applause] thank you. app fair dislow sure. i'm hoping it's aer in i did nerdy crowd -- [cheering and applause] you are my people. [laughter] there's no reader's health advice here. i'm not going tell you how to get the best out of the doctor. there are no idle conspiracy theories how drug companies are trying to kill us. it's a story about flaws in how we dwat gather evidence in medicine. i think the technical flaws in important technical process very well documented in the medical academic professional literature what i'm hope dog is share that more broadly with the public. in particular because there's several very well documented problems which we have failed as a profession to fix. and so i think we need the help more than anything else of the public. it's sort of a -- mass they are people like nerds and lawyers and d
about some of the important historical, literary and cultural science in the area. next we bring the story of the set in in 1939 >> 19395 african-americans were arrested at the alexandria city library as they tried to obtain a library card. the attorney general samuel tucker was beyond the set in which resulted in the creation of a separate library for its black residents. we traveled to the site of the original sin-in and for a place where the black library was built to meet today and african-american history uneasy come to tell the story of samuel tucker and the people that are arrested the day for the act to get a library card. estimate august 31st 5 african-american young men who were not allowed to use the library came in and each politely asked for a library card. they were denied, set down at separate tables and the staff just didn't know what to do with fat to get paid taxes, fall also walls but they are not able to take part in the things of the alexandria citizen was about to take part in. this is part of a program that the young local attorney had been working on for s
capita, per student with the rank and 25 otas 37 default nation's, 17 in science and 14 and reading? >> when i share those statistics with people they cringe a little bit. we are 25th in math and some of the countries ahead of us are hon mariana slovenia. i think as americans we don't expect to be behind slovenia or hungary. when i started years ago someone showed me a scatter plot of all of the developed nations in the world and on the one access it was academic achievement levels of the students and on the other access was the amount of money that country spends per child on their public education system. we were in the cauldrons that you do not want to be which is spending a lot of money and have poor results and the only other thing that was in the squadron plus luxembourg. i think the problem with this notion is that for decades, people have been pushing this idea that what we need in order to fix a system is more money, more money. but when i got to d.c. it wasn't the case they were more than any of our jurisdiction and the entire nation. in new york and new jersey they're spe
a big new university called the king abdullah university of science and technology, which not only makes a saudi men and women, but mixes them with infidel men and women from all over the world. and when one of the 20 senior religious scholars was asked about the appropriateness of this on tv, he said it's wrong. and the king fired him because the king appoints these 20 people, and not surprisingly, many of the other senior men began to discover that the prophet had had his hair washed by women, and other things that made this okay. so people see this, if you will, double standard, and it has undermined it, the credibility of the religious establishment. obviously, with the deeply religious but also with those who don't mind the mixing at all, but just think it's, if they can can get the religious to approve this, why can't they make them approve more things like women driving or whatever. the second pillar of stability in the kingdom is obviously the oil wealth that buys them at least acquiescence, if not loyalty anymore, for the government and royal family. 90% of the treasury in saudi
but that is what tenure gets us or faculty to do a full inquiry to grow the knowledge and science because students could participate in the research projects so if i want my money's worth i am in favor of that. >> host: would you teach? >> i teach criminal law also at the school of public affairs that they teach law society. >> host: was part due to right this? >> i've been teaching over 20 years and i was beginning to see the same problems over and over like not knowing how to cite material getting themselves in trouble in denver in may but see a great new world that is college to take advantage of the classroom and i raggedy male students i began to use see i was sending the same e-mail's out year after year and it is time to write the book now i can say by the book. >> host: what is the best thing parents can do? >> one is academic side one is reading and writing it is as true today as in the olden days but the other thing parents can do is to get students ready to live lives on their own be here so much about helicopter parents they need to get their students ready this is as simple as had to
a conference, the annual conference of the american political science association, which even now -- certainly then is very austere and trickish and boring event, and we try to. it up a little bit. we had a lot of good ideas. none of which i will mention until the cameras are shut off. [laughter] and i want to say, it was adjust lot of fun to work with ben. when i told them when the ideas were it, it will improve your -- [inaudible] [laughter] so ben has a point of view about how to save the world because the world is in a kind of planet, as we know it, and our country as we know it, is in big trouble. and those troubles include the ecological crisis that we hear about all the time and go about our daily life just as we did before, as if there will be a tomorrow and a tomorrow and tomorrow but there might not be. those troubles include widening spiraling inequality. they include the erosion of the infrastructure of democratic governance but the structure of living together that means the infrastructure of transportation and utilities, the networks that we depend upon as well as the governing s
the government institution itself. a private company was hired by the name of science application international corporation to plan the ministries in iraq. and institute of north carolina which had to teach iraqis about democracy. like to take this opportunity to read a little bit from each of the chapters and then take questions from you about the broader picture. the book as books tend to be coming into, take a little time to get published so the last thing that about in this book was written in july of last ye year. the last time as kabbalah or as complex as like to be able to take the opportunity to explain how things have involved and how much more we know about especially the fraud and waste of taxpayer that is occurred in iraq. so the first chapter is called operational sweatshop iraq and it's about the company halliburton and the amount of money they made in iraq. today we know they have made $10 million in contracts called the provision of every kind of service. the reason the chapters called operation sweatshop iran is of the very nature of the way they do business. typically as much
human rights problem but then i read the science and realized that only of big human-rights problem but there was a foundation in ireland of climate justice that stars with injustice those that are these responsible. it is beginning to affect there is said disconnect but the other would be quite hard that is in to your generational justice. for a short period of time to take measures to curtail the carbon emissions and adapt with slow car been energy because already we have warned the world to a stage of climate shocks that we were headed for the 4 degrees world than it describes that it is catastrophic. the worst in porous parts affects everybody like the titanic. not just the people in steerage who survives. and that it is confusing people that we have forgotten about the people. but let me finish. i don't want to speak for too long. hopefully we have a question and answer but how i captured intergenerational justice. our first grandchild was born he is the older child of the daughter who helped me right. when the number one was born i had a physical reaction. somehow i read calib
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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